No dress? No problem

MARSHALL – For Marshall area girls who would like to go to prom, but who think they can’t because of the high costs involved, help is on the way.

Operation Prom Dress is in full gear. Girls from the surrounding area can receive a free prom dress by e-mailing fieldsofgrace@live.com

“Participation is confidential,” said Terrie Lendt of Fields of Grace, a charitable organization. “And you don’t have to fill out any forms.”

“Girls can select their dress March 16 and can have it fitted,” said Rhonda Christensen, a Fields of Grace member.

The altered dress can be picked up April 22.

Dress selection (including shoes and accessories) and fitting will be from 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday, March 16, at the Marshall Area YMCA.

“Come in and you’ll be able to get a dress,” said Lendt. “All girls should be able to have the experience of going to prom and looking nice.”

In addition, Fields of Grace volunteers are working on assembling prize bags with items from different businesses.

“We have plenty of volunteers who want to help,” Lendt said. “We have college girls, older ladies…”

Lendt, who has three daughters and knows about costs associated with prom, was in Sioux Falls, S.D., recently and talked with someone who is involved in Operation Prom Dress there.

“She said there were a couple Marshall girls signed up,” Lendt said.

That got Lendt to thinking that a local Operation was needed.

Lendt said Operation Prom Dress in Marshall already has many dresses.

“We have a lot of beautiful dresses that we’re getting,” she said. “We have short, long – every style.”

Midwest Cleaners and Carrow’s Cleaners are cleaning the dresses.

A lot of the dresses are from Carrow’s, which has received dresses for cleaning that don’t get picked up.

“They used to donate them somewhere else,” Lendt said.

Lendt said girls don’t have to have a date for prom, but those who do can ask about the tuxedo scholarships at Carrow’s.

Lendt is hoping to get shoes donated and also services provided such as hair styling.

In addition, “we’re working on transportation,” she said. “Some girls don’t have licenses or cars.”